TUTOR FEEDBACK/REFLECTIVE COMMENTARY

*Any notes to tutors feedback are highlighted in brackets*

ASSIGNMENT 1 REFLECTORY COMMENTARY

Mixing and matching the colours ‘worked’ together, but feel that more work was needed. Seeing the actual colour was difficult and held me back. After experimenting it became easier and I became aware of elements, previously missed.

Watercolours were the better medium, as it was unpredictable and showed variation. The Gouache wasn’t easy to use and was a little too harsh in its application.

The colour exercises showed that using different marks and colours, no too pictures were the same. This was the same for the painting exercise and showed that using colour, different variations could be achieved. I think I have narrowed my options by the theme I have chosen. Overall I was pleased with the work produced. The Stage 6 exercise was vibrant and texture produced was far better than I hoped for. A definite for any future designs!

Spacial awareness became obvious as I played with ideas. Drawing the eye to various points within a picture. The peacock feather from my sketchbook, initially narrowed my creative thoughts and made me doubt myself. As the project progressed confidence grew enabling me to stretch my imagination. The drawings that have been achieved, gives scope for further adaptations.

The designs chosen were a good basis for further development. The shape was easily adapted as I prefer working with softer lines.Various fabrics were used. My preference was velvet with Bleach,, leaving an interesting surface that was unpredictable.

The scale of the samples made were proportionate to the design painted. Larger designs would have overpowered the size. Different fabrics used had variations of paint type and density.
The placement of the design worked well and I wouldn’t change it. The negative shapes became obvious, the more the piece was worked on. Contrast and harmony was
determined by the shapes and colour used. The other factor was material used. The larger sample felt well balanced and achieved what I had set out to do. Spacing out the individual patterns, worked better than putting them all together, possibly due to the shape of the background. The work could be worked on a smaller scale and possibly this would work better closer together. Overall I have learnt how composition, colour and design are all integral.

Assignment 1 Tutor report

Student name Carolyne Herbert -Carter Student number 512924
Course/Module Textiles 1 A Creative Approach Assignment number 1

Overall Comments
You have obviously worked hard on this submission and made sure that everything is presented in order and clearly labelled.  Thank you for taking the time to do this.  It enhances your presentation and makes it easier to assess your work.  I can see in the work that your confidence has increased as you have progressed through this first assignment.

Assessment potential
You may want to get credit for your hard work and achievements with the OCA by formally submitting your work for assessment at the end of the module. More and more people are taking the idea of lifelong learning seriously by submitting their work for assessment but it is entirely up to you. We are just as keen to support you whether you study for pleasure or to gain qualifications. Please consider whether you want to put your work forward for assessment and let me know your decision when you submit Assignment 2. I can then give you feedback on how well your work meets the assessment requirements.

Feedback on assignment

Project 1 Mark Making
Stage 2 Making Marks in an expressive way

Exercise 1
In the first exercise you have thoroughly worked through the process of making marks to express descriptive words. The most successful here are you sensuous and sharp interpretations. In general there could be further exploration beyond the use of line, so for example hard sharp marks, scribbles and splodges.

Exercise 2 shows a broader range of marks to explore tone, this work well because you are less focused on shapes.

Exercise 3 and 4
You have used a good range of materials and media here and you show imagination with the combinations of media you have used. At points it feels like you focused more on the creation of interesting surfaces rather than using marks to express emotions.  Never the less you have achieved a good variety of techniques and been inventive with your use of materials
(Need to express emotions)

Stage 3 Using marks to create surface textures
Exercise 1
Out of your two interpretations of the Max Herne postcards; the parrots are the best attempt at expressing surface texture.  Try not to focus so much on shape and outline as in the case of the balloons.  It works best where you have zoomed in plumage of the birds feathers.
(Don’t focus too much on shape and outline)

Exercise 2
You interpretations of the surface qualities of objects are more successful as you have focused less on the whole object and picked out the surface texture.  The surface of the hessian chair works well, as it is a good exploration of tone.
(Focus on areas rather than the whole image)

Stage 4 working from your sketch book
You have produced some bold abstract designs by zooming in on sections of your drawing.  The limitation of choosing this artwork is that, although colourful and decorative it does not contain a lot of texture information.  Therefore your series of drawing have varied composition and tonal shading, but you have not been able to fully explore the potential of mark making to depict texture.
(Explore more with mark making)

Project 2 developing your marks
Stage 2 Exploring marks and lines through stitch techniques
Stitch techniques have been investigated using a range thread weights and thickness on a variety of fabric bases.  You work demonstrates an adequate level of technical skill.

Stage3 A sample
Your drawing taken from the engraving is a good interpretation of the lines and movement shown within the original artwork.  Your hand stitches capture the curved fluid style of the marks shown in your artwork.  The placement of the stitches could be closer together in areas and you could have perhaps included some finer yarns in the piece to add further contrast.  The choice of velvet as the base fabric distracts from the stitch work, a simpler neutral base would have been more beneficial to the piece. It is unclear where your colour palette has developed from. Further drawings including some colour would have strengthened this link.
(Need to do more drawings)

Stages 4 and 5 Stitches to create texture.
You have created an exciting collection of samples based on your mark making observations. I like the bold scale you have used in these samples the results show a growing confidence with expressing yourself through stitch.  The composition of the samples is also much improved and shows more creativity compared to your earlier work in stage 2.

In this project stage you have produced your strongest work to date in the following two samples:

Sample based on Gold collage
The composition of this piece is successful because although it is clear how it links to your artwork, you have not tried to create a literal translation.  Selection of stitch type is varied and expressive.  You capture the sense of layering by incorporating fabric collage and contrast this with the curvaceous fluid quality of the black and gold fabric strip yarn.

Sample based on witches’ ball
You show imagination in how the reflection from the surfaces of the witches’ balls has suggested a ravens head.  This has been well explored in your artwork. Yarn selection is varied and depicts the form and surface qualities of your inspiration.  The sense of distortion and movement has been further enhanced by your choice and placement of stitches.

Stage 6 Using thread and yarn to create texture.
You have selected a good art work on which to base your sample, there are lots of possibilities here for translating textural detail into stitch.  There is a clear link from the artwork to your selection of colour, yarn and fabrics. However I think the final sample would have benefited from a simpler composition and less layering of fabrics as this has made the final sample quite bulky.  As an alternative the stitch work could have been placed directly onto the base fabric and not on the white fabric sections.
(Link work and make sure work not too bulky)

Sketchbook
Thank you for sending your sketch book on witchcraft.   I can see that you are really inspired by this theme.   It is good to see that you enjoy drawing and working from a range found of inspirational sources.  I think it would be really beneficial if you could include more drawings and artworks from primary sources, as you did with the witches ball to complement your secondary research.  You could consider what other objects are symbolic to witchcraft.    Be careful about overworking coloured backgrounds to some of your artworks as these can distract from the detail of your research
(Look for more images/don’t overwork images)

Learning Blog
Do not feel that you need to document every exercise on your blog, otherwise this will become a very time consuming task for you.  It is better to post a few examples of exercises you particularly enjoyed or found difficult and comment on what you have learnt from them.

Your reflective commentary shows that you are starting to evaluate the work you produce, which is good.  On the whole the statements are quite descriptive of process. In addition to this try to consider how things make you feel or if they remind of work by other artists or designers.  You can also comment on how you would approach tasks differently with hindsight.
(Don’t put everything on the blog/approach on tasks)

Suggested reading/viewing
Although not based on which craft I think you may find it useful to look at the work of Renée Stout  (American, born 1958)  who utilizes imagery from African traditions, popular culture, and personal politics to create images and objects in a variety of media. Goya  a number of his works deal with witch craft themes

Pointers for the next assignment

  • Be mind full of choosing strong colour or very dominate fabrics as backgrounds as these can sometime overpower or distract from the intricacies of your stitch design work
    (Don’t choose bright colours for the background)
  • You do not need to mount all textile samples separately on individual card backings.  You could mount a selection of pieces on one sheet of A3. The best method is just to tack them in the top corners so that the fabric can be easily viewed to assess handle and drape.
    (Don’t mount all the samples)
  • Do not feel you need to document every exercise on the blog
    (Don’t need to document everything)
  • Include more primary research in your sketch book ( observational pieces from real objects)
    (More primary research)
Tutor name Julie Stephenson
Date 22/9/14
Next assignment due 30/11/14

ASSIGNMENT 2 REFLECTIVE COMMENTARY
Overall I was happy with the shapes and movement in my work with both manipulating fabric and appliqué, with surprising results eg cutting back, created depth. However, colour choice would be a consideration for future designs, as some pieces did not work’.

Manipulating the fabric gave a 3D impression not achieved with stitch alone and quicker to achieve.  It was interesting experimenting with the folds of the fabric, not quite knowing whether it would work or not.

This altered the ‘feel’ and look of the original drawings and changed conceptual ideas. Having a reference was useful gave a basis to work from. Ideas were changed a few times, before deciding which technique ‘fitted’ the work. It was liberating to enjoy the freedom to experiment rather than the rigidity of formal art, for example portrait painting.

I enjoy working with stitch and how it can change by altering the direction, colour, hand or machine work (which is my favourite way to ‘paint’). Trapping fabrics produced amazing effects and would definitely use again.

Tyvek was not inspirational, but would not discount its usefulness. Soluble fabric was unpredictable producing an idea for a future project, a corset. Changing the direction of the pleating gave a different quality to the piece and changed previously held opinions of the construction of it and therefore appreciating the work involved.

Tearing, fraying and slashing felt wrong to do, however the results were interesting. Having never attempted quilting before, found this was by far one of the best techniques achieved, one definitely to explore. 

TUTOR FEEDBACK ASSIGNMENT 2
Overall, well-presented work, though there are some important aspects missing, which need to be started and completed with the next assignment please. I have stated what these are in the following feedback, please read through my comments carefully.

I understand your aim is to go for the Painting/Textiles/Creative Arts* Degree and that you plan to submit your work for assessment at the end of this course. From the work you have shown in this assignment, providing you commit yourself to the course, I believe you have the potential to succeed at assessment.  In order to meet all the assessment criteria, there are certain areas you will need to focus on, which I will outline in my feedback.   

Feedback on assignment
Good use of gouache paint to create your colour exercises. Next time when you use gouache paint, also consider using it thicker in consistency in order to obtain a more opaque colour over the more translucent, watery colours that you have produced.
(Need to  practice more on the use of Gouache, as never used before)

Stage 6 sample, where you combine the textures and colour effects on the black felt using stitched knots, works very well and is bold and energetic in design.
It is great that you are collecting textile materials from car boot sales and you are using them to inspire your work. Keep this up. The lace that you found is a good starting point for observational drawing which in turn will generate more ideas for textile designs later.

You have made a good attempt at drawing the lace, which must have taken you a while to create. Consider next time using a small home made viewing frame made simply of paper, to frame a small section of your ‘object’ that you are drawing from and use more appropriate media to draw just that section. ‘More appropriate’ media means using media that will reproduce the qualities of the object, for example you could have also used a harder graphite pencil lead, to draw the finer details of your lace structure.
(Need to use a viewing frame and appropriate material)

You have translated the centre of the tulip sensitively using the cut paper, collage technique and you have thus created a very nice collage! I would encourage you to use this technique again in your work.

The drawing of the peacock feather using charcoal could be developed further into a repeating image for a textile design. Especially the ‘largish, floral looking design drawing’ in the bottom right hand side of the sheet.

Your experiments of the peacock feather using various media towards possible ‘light hangings’ show very personal ideas and these sheets (including the one using gold) have much potential. Again I would encourage you to use these techniques of paint and collage to develop subsequent work.
(develop techniques with paint and collage)

You have clearly enjoyed producing your textile samples, which are interesting in hand painted qualities. I would encourage you to research further into dyes and pigments that give you are softer handle on the cloth. The samples that you have created using silk painting techniques have a lovely quality and feel and you have produced a small group of well-executed samples using this technique. Well Done.

The black and white stitched sample on the dissolvable fabric is also very interesting in design and method of application

Sketchbooks
You forgot to enclose your sketchbook in with the rest of the work that you sent me but thank you for emailing me some visuals of some drawings, unfortunately most of the images were blurred.
(Make sure all work is included)

Do you keep a small size sketchbook, which you draw in? There are many interesting drawing, painting and collage work in your portfolio, made from your visual observations. I suggest that you carry a small sketchbook with you that you can draw in at any time from any source, even if it is just making marks expressively or doodling from your imagination. In this way you will be able to build on your confidence for drawing. I would encourage you to take this sketchbook along with you to exhibitions.
(Use a sketchbook on field trips)

Learning Logs or Blogs/Critical essays
You haven’t provided a 500 word reflective commentary, as I pointed out in a previous email, you could have used your blog to help you with this. The reflective commentary needs to really come from your learning log and it should describe your experience of this part of the course. Please provide this if asked for it for the next assignment.
(Make sure all information is included)

You should also be writing a learning log to document your thoughts on how you are developing and your thoughts as above on the course. Please begin a learning log in the next assignment. This could be kept in a file, and you can send me the relevant one as you go along, as well as keeping a record of your learning. Please contact the OCA if you are still unclear about the learning log. Did you have one for the first assignment? Could you develop from that one?
(Develop the learning log)

Suggested reading/viewing
I suggest to develop your research into silk painting that you look at the work of Carole Waller and Noel Dyrenforth who is a batik artist.
carolewaller.co.uk
www.noeldyrenforth.com

Also in your last email you asked for some advice on your research into women’s clothing. I do hope that you make it to the V&A Museum to follow up my recommendation and also to see the forthcoming Alexander McQueen exhibition. Don’t forget to take photographs, if you are allowed and record what you see/draw from the exhibits too.
(try to attend more exhibition (although this is difficult as I find it hard to go outside of Worcester)

Pointers for the next assignment
I suggest that when you produce more textile samples, that you do not include the ‘excess, un-worked’ areas of the cloth with your textile sample. That is, you need to time off the excess and leave approximately half to one inch of a border around your design. This will frame your work and present the pattern in a better format for viewing and appreciating your work.
(Make sure unworked area is trimmed off to produce a better finish)

Perhaps consider producing smaller size samples, for example postcard size for the next assignment and then when you are ready to generate more personal samples, then gradually scale up to A4 size.
(Experiment with scale)

Please refer very carefully to the course documents and don’t forget to regularly remind yourself of the list on page 116, which shows the checklist of the work that you need to send to me, by post or email.
(use the checklist)

I suggest that you begin generating your ideas for your ‘theme book’ as early as possible and continue to collect material for it, alongside developing your samples when you work through the exercises for assignment 3. Remember the theme is based on your personal choice!

I feel that you could keep the flow going, therefore I have set a date for the completion of assignment 3 for April 1st, please let me know if this is realistic or not.

Tutor name SHARON TING
Date 20th January 2015
Next assignment due APRIL 1st 2015.

ASSIGNMENT 3   REFLECTORY COMMENTARY
Hand twisted cords and braided cords was difficult to do, because instructions weren’t read properly.  But having grasped the technique got carried away with construction. Overall, the results were pleasing with many variations of colour and texture.

Having never done weaving, it was daunting. The initial piece of weaving was on child’s wooden loom which was slow to set up and weave.  However, the effect required for the wooden loom sample showed in its quality (tightness and strength). It was the best sample made.

The card loom sped up the process, however, the woven piece lost its rigidity. And by using different materials, although not as tight, gave a softer quality. The looser weave show different textures, as opposed to the flat surface of the first sample.

Changing the base material, whether cord or wool, altered the size of the warp and gave a furrowed surface. The qualities of the piece changed according to lie of the weave, what materials, used or colours. This has inspired me to research this further, and may use this for my end piece.

There was a good choice of yarn and varying from 2 ply, 3ply, textured or coarser yarns.
It was easier to manipulate thinner wools. Coarser textured wools distorted the warp giving depth and interest. The results of all these pieces, showed surprising results of how weaving can alter a picture into something more tactile and colourful, whilst keeping the ideas of the original. It was stimulating to see the various structures, variations in colours, shape and textures and how colour can change the mood of the image.

The mood board was something not attempted before and was useful for composition. The finished sample reflected colours, but the design was changed to fit in with the original picture. Colour combination through my exploration have improved immensely. However when using my sketchbook, different mediums need to be explored. As its noticed that changing the medium can change the outcome.

Changes to be made, would be to do more preparatory work. Also to choose a picture that has simpler lines, colours and shapes. The image chosen is different from the woven piece as the techniques altered the way it should have been. More practice is needed with this technique and ‘stitching’ chosen more carefully.

Working more intuitively generated ideas easily rather than working from a grid. I wanted the freedom to explore the effects of colour change and shapes created. For example shapes within a shape.

After receiving my feedback from my tutor I decided to re-evaluate my work, going back to basics. I have realised the importance of timetables, to ensure work is on time for the next assignment.

Assignment 3Tutor report

Overall Comments

This project is a short one based compared to the others in Textiles 2. Although you have produced a relevant body of work I feel that at this stage I really need to encourage you to develop and create more work from a more personal approach. The textiles that you have created have lots of potential but you need to develop a more in-depth body of work, drawings and paintings as well, in a sketchbook type format.
(Need to develop my drawings)

You have the potential to do this and you just need keep up the continuity. I also feel you are relying too much on the course materials as inspiration and you need to take the risk to produce more work of a personal nature, especially if you want to put your work forward for assessment.
(Take more risks)

You need to experiment more and allow yourself to be as creative as you can be. You need to explore beyond the suggestions in the course materials, in order to develop a more personal body of work. I do not wish to be overly critical but I do have to express my concern at this stage about the lack of drawing and painting needed for design development.
(Again more drawings needed)

You have all the skills to make textile samples but you must develop the visual research side, along with your making skills. For the reasons above, I am undecided as to which box below is the most relevant to your progress at this point in time. I think it is box 1, which is more relevant but you must please develop your visual research work alongside your woven samples for the next assignment.
(Need to develop visual research)

Student name Carolyn Herbert-Carter Student number 5 12924
Course/Module Textiles 1: A Creative Approach Assignment number 3

I understand your aim is to go for the Painting/Textiles/Creative Arts* Degree and that you plan to submit your work for assessment at the end of this course. From the work you have shown in this assignment, providing you commit yourself to the course, I believe you have the potential to succeed at assessment. In order to meet all the assessment criteria, there are certain areas you will need to focus on, which I will outline in my feedback.

I understand your aim is to go for the Painting/Textiles/Creative Arts * Degree and that you plan to submit your work for assessment at the end of this course. However, from the work you have shown in this assignment, I am concerned that you may struggle to meet the assessment criteria, and recommend that you instead consider taking the personal development route rather than seek assessment (see Conditions of Enrolment, Section 2 a).

I will review your work again in terms of readiness for assessment at Assignment 4.

Feedback on assignment

I wrote in an email to you the following: I think that it is fine for you to research Elizabethan dress but what is as important as the research theme that you have selected, is the process of primary research method i.e the method of researching towards your theme.

The course material suggests that you should illustrate your research by collecting examples of both real stuff and images but it also says that you should go on visits to a place of interest and visit material/fabric shops to collect ‘bits’ that relate to your research theme.
(Need to find local textile exhibition)

Is there a historic house/place of interest near you that you can visit to gather more research on your theme of Elizabethan dress?I suggested going to the V&A Museum to see the Alexander McQueen exhibition and this would link to the contemporary aspect of fabric, fashion and female form but it sounds as if you would like to keep a historical focus, which is fine to do.

There is an exhibition currently on in Edinburgh at the Holyrood Gallery which you can research online. I’m not suggesting you visit there, as it is a distance from your home but you could research it online the link is below.

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/exhibitions/in-fine-style-the-art-oftudor-and-stuart-fashion

Also consider looking at Vivienne Westwood, as she her cites that her influences come from the Elizabethan period and has translated this inspiration into her textile and fashion designs.

The research that you provided on your blog page is informative and relevant but you need to be more specific on verbalising how this reference, influences and informs your own sample making and design developments.
(Need to verbalise more)

You did take on board my suggestion to create smaller samples and work to the edge of the cloth and not include the excess, un-worked cloth, around the edges of your samples.
(Smaller samples and no excess material)

The stiff 3 dimensional samples that you produced (that came in the plastic box,) are the most interesting from the group that you sent. They are intriguing because they show the most design potential in terms of ideas to develop further in a larger scale.

I can see only little developments of ideas from your drawing that informs your textile work. This is mainly because your textile samples seem to be a group of work on their own, with little reference to your sketches of the mushrooms? It might be that there is a connection in your mind which you have not illustrated, in this case you need to pull out the samples, which best relate to your drawings in the A3 book, and place/mount them alongside this work.
(Need to connect ideas)

The remainder of your ‘test samples’ can go in a separate box or a plastic folder.Having said the above, the first 3 pages in your A3 folder, do show some design development from a drawing through to a textile sample and this is a very good start, well done! Please keep this approach of exploration going, in a more in-depth way, especially for the next assignment.

Sketchbooks
Demonstration of technical and Visual Skills, Demonstration of Creativity

Although you provided some sheets of drawing in the A3 folder, which is a start, in your last report I advised you to do the following:

Do you keep a small size sketchbook, which you draw in? I suggest that you carry a small sketchbook with you that you can draw in at any time from any source, even if it is just making marks expressively or doodling from your imagination. In this way you will be able to build on your confidence for drawing. I would encourage you to take this sketchbook along with you to exhibitions.
(Keep a sketchbook)

Have you begun this yet? If you do not like to work in a bought sketchbook. You can continue to work o loose sheets if you prefer and then put them together to make your own ‘sketchbook’. You have just started to sketch and draw, please keep this up!

I see where your ideas for the pastel sketches of ‘alcoholic drinks,’ from ‘under the microscope’ comes from, as it is explained briefly on your blog page but I feel you could explain this more in depth, as it could be an interesting beginning for some more personal work.
(Explain more about work)

Where does the mushroom idea come from and how does this relate?Is it related to the witchcraft idea? I am confused, as in, do both of the above thoughts relate to the theme of your research into Elizabethan dress? Or just separate research themes.

You need to provide a clear explanation of where your ideas come From and what is behind the reasons for your selection of these themes.
(Need to link ideas)

Learning Logs or Blogs/Critical essays
Context
I have not seen much evidence of your short reflective commentary of 500 words? Have I somehow missed this? I did read your comments and ideas in your sketchbook but there is no reflective commentary, is this on your blog, in which case I may have misunderstood? Is it under assignment 2 – the last paragraph on your blog page?
(make sure reflective commentary is in with work)

I think you may need to make it clearer that it is your log and perhaps send me a printed version which gets put into a file containing all your reflective commentaries.

Pointers for the next assignment

Some sorting or grouping of your samples would have helped you to reflect to develop more creative samples from your initial ones.
(Group Samples)

As I said at the beginning of the report: I feel you are relying on the course materials too much and you need to take the risk to produce more work of a personal nature, especially if you want to put your work forward for assessment.
(Don’t rely on coursework, use own judgement)

In order to begin to develop this aspect, I would encourage you to produce more work than the initial technical/exercises suggest that you do.
(Produce more work)

In order to do this you need to develop more work from your initial samples, alongside your visual research. I suggest that you ensure that you pick out samples that interest you the most and deeply reflect on these to examine why you think they are working well, then develop these elements further. To do this you need to connect the samples you are developing to elements of your visual research in the form of your drawings/sketches/ideas from your sketchbook work.

Think very carefully about a personal inspiration as a starting point for your next assignment into weaving and ensure that the visual research that you develop has a clear connection/inspiration to develop into weave/woven structure. For example, you could analyze and draw woven cloth, woven structures, woven baskets, string, rope , braid.
(Clear connections)

You could draw small repeating elements that could provide inspiration for woven structure. You could look at anything that inspires you to develop textile structures.
(draw repeat elements from inspiration)

I would encourage you to draw the little stiff 3D structures that you created for this assignment, as they relate very closely to the next one.You could develop this technique further and experiment with different materials in the next assignment.

Please don’t forget to experiment more and develop more work from the suggested exercises in the course materials. You have a tendency to be very tentative and have asked for re-assurance and wanted my approval before you go ahead with some ideas. This is natural but you must take more control over the development of your work. The course materials are there to help you as a starting point and are a guide only.
(Experiment more)

You need to believe that you have the skills to develop your work further and enjoy the process of experimenting with all the highs and lows that come with being creative.

TUTOR FEEDBACK

Tutor name SHARON TING
Date 10th April 2015
Next assignment due 30th May 2015 – please confirm if this is realistic for you.

Assignment 4  REFLECTORY COMMENTARY
Hand twisted cords and braided cords was difficult to do, because instructions weren’t read properly.  But having grasped the technique got carried away with construction. Overall, the results were pleasing with many variations of colour and texture.

Having never done weaving, it was daunting. The initial piece of weaving was on child’s wooden loom which was slow to set up and weave.  However, the effect required for the wooden loom sample showed in its quality (tightness and strength). It was the best sample made.

The card loom sped up the process, however, the woven piece lost its rigidity. And by using different materials, although not as tight, gave a softer quality. The looser weave show different textures, as opposed to the flat surface of the first sample.

Changing the base material, whether cord or wool, altered the size of the warp and gave a furrowed surface. The qualities of the piece changed according to lie of the weave, what materials, used or colours. This has inspired me to research this further, and may use this for my end piece.

There was a good choice of yarn and varying from 2 ply, 3ply, textured or coarser yarns.
It was easier to manipulate thinner wools. Coarser textured wools distorted the warp giving depth and interest. The results of all these pieces, showed surprising results of how weaving can alter a picture into something more tactile and colourful, whilst keeping the ideas of the original. It was stimulating to see the various structures, variations in colours, shape and textures and how colour can change the mood of the image.

The mood board was something not attempted before and was useful for composition. The finished sample reflected colours, but the design was changed to fit in with the original picture. Colour combination through my exploration have improved immensely. However when using my sketchbook, different mediums need to be explored. As its noticed that changing the medium can change the outcome.

Changes to be made, would be to do more preparatory work. Also to choose a picture that has simpler lines, colours and shapes. The image chosen is different from the woven piece as the techniques altered the way it should have been. More practice is needed with this technique and ‘stitching’ chosen more carefully.

Working more intuitively generated ideas easily rather than working from a grid. I wanted the freedom to explore the effects of colour change and shapes created. For example shapes within a shape.

After receiving my feedback from my tutor I decided to re-evaluate my work, going back to basics. I have realised the importance of timetables, to ensure work is on time for the next assignment.

Tutor report

Student name Carolyn  Herbert-Carter Student number 512924
Course/Module Textiles 1: A Creative Approach Assignment number 4

Overall Comments
I said in my last feedback
“I also feel you are relying too much on the course materials as inspiration and you need to take the risk to produce more work of a personal nature, especially if you want to put your work forward for assessment.
(Take risks)

You need to experiment more and allow yourself to be as creative as you can be. You need to explore beyond the suggestions in the course materials, in order to develop a more personal body of work.
(Experiment more)

I do not wish to be overly critical but I do have to express my concern at this stage about the lack of drawing and painting needed for design development.
(So more drawings)

You have all the skills to make textile samples but you must develop the visual research side, along with your making skills.”
(Need visual references)

You have taken my comments on board and you have produced work that shows a much more personal way of working, through your selection of yarns for the weave samples and through the work in your smaller sketchbook.

I understand your aim is to go for the Painting/Textiles/Creative Arts* Degree and that you plan to submit your work for assessment at the end of this course. From the work you have shown in this assignment, providing you commit yourself to the course, I believe you have the potential to succeed at assessment.  In order to meet all the assessment criteria, there are certain areas you will need to focus on, which I will outline in my feedback.    

Feedback on assignment & Sketchbooks
In your last feedback I also said:
“I can see only little developments of ideas from your drawing that informs your textile work.  This is mainly because your textile samples seem to be a group of work on their own, with little reference to your sketches of the mushrooms? It might be that there is a connection in your mind which you have not illustrated, in this case you need to pull out the samples, which best relate to your drawings in the A3 book, and place/mount them alongside this work. The remainder of your  ‘test samples’ can go in a separate box or a plastic folder.

Having said the above, the first 3 pages in your A3 folder, do show some design development from a drawing through to a textile sample and this is a very good start, well done! Please keep this approach of exploration going, in a more in-depth way, especially for the next assignment.” – Which you have done!

I am very excited by the latest developments in your sketchbook. This is because you have observed from a source of personal inspiration, your doodles patterns and microscopic images, and then you have translated these into design developments which also translate/relate through to your textile samples. The beginning, middle and end of your design process connects and flows very well in terms of your thinking and making. Well Done.

I hope that you enjoyed producing this group of work, which I feel is by far the strongest assignment I have received from you. Did you enjoy this one the most? Perhaps it is in this area of constructed textiles that you most identify with? There is more of an understandable narrative overall in your work.

The work that you have developed in your smaller sketchbook is thoughtful and clearly shows you have begun to ‘design and experiment.’ The last salt and watercolour papers are really intriguing and the fine stitch element working with the watercolour, works very well. I would encourage you to develop more of these experiments, as these have much potential.
(Develop ideas)

Overall in all your sketchbooks, there is much more risk taking and experimentation in contrast to the last project, well done. I want to encourage you to continue doing this but next focus on gathering qualities from the things you want to draw and then combine these qualities with the textile ideas that you developed in your samples relating them to your sketchbook , by introducing small samples into your sketchbook at the relevant points.
(Gather qualities)

In this combined approach you will have a stronger body of design developments that relate to your samples that you create ‘out of your sketchbook’.

Learning Logs or Blogs/Critical essays
I hope that you gained more insight from writing your 500 word commentary on your work. I found reading it helped me to understand your working process. Next begin to expand on this and reflect more on your creative thoughts, alongside your descriptions of the making side, as well as your critique of your samples.

Pointers for the next assignment
To extend your knowledge of constructed textiles, I suggest that you look at the work of Ptolemy Mann, Wallace and Sewell, Rita Parnizky, Laura Thomas, Makeba Lewis as examples of contemporary weavers and then look at the work of Peter Collingwood and Tadek Beutlic in contrast. Amelia Uden who’s weave is held by the Crafts Study Centre, would also be inspirational. For the next assignment, think about developing and continuing from this reference material, that you have gathered in this assignment.(develop work)

This may allow you to dig deeper into pattern and colour and develop the work that has begun in your sketchbook.

Spend some time to think about what you would like to achieve, have a few ideas for the context, ask yourself is it for fashion for furnishings or art ? Do I want to make something, a product, an item or a collection of textile designs. Is it designs for square scarves!
(Have a clear goal, of what i want the design to be used for)

Then gather more visual research and develop drawing towards your context, your early developments are a starting point and you can take your ideas wherever you want, in terms of realization.
(gather more visual research)

Your project proposal needs to reflect your initial research ideas. If you think about writing your proposal, like a plan or schedule to organize your thoughts, this might be more relevant than thinking of it as another written piece.
(Write a plan)

I feel that you can change and adapt your project proposal to suit your creative development and in this way your project proposal develops with you. If you decide to do a more organic plan like this, you just have to remember to keep original copies and date them, so that you can show the development.

You do have to have some clear aims though and also an idea of a final piece/pieces or collection that works together.

Why don’t you write an initial plan and then email it to me for some feedback.

You have begun to move your samples from being ‘technical’ samples, meaning samples that you have created just to try out the techniques as the course materials suggest that you do, you need to develop more links back to your source of reference material.  In this assignment you have begun research, which is beginning to translate through your pattern in your sketchbook into woven textile samples. You need to recognize this development for yourself and keep up this approach.
(be confident and recognise what i can do)

It may help you to use a ‘pin board’ and onto this to create a ‘picture’ of connecting elements, ranging from your initial reference – one visual image – drawing/mark making that connects to this reference – a sample – key ideas to develop into a textile – and so forth.
(Use a pin board)

If you then photograph this thought process and include it in your log book or sketchbook, it clearly shows your thinking/design process and helps with assessment. You can then dissemble theses bits and arrange them how you like to present them in whatever format suits your practice and you will have a record of your thinking and sorting method. (Rearrange the pieces for different compositions)

I am sure you may have already done this simply by laying out all your work in front of you and sorting out ideas and connections between pieces, you just need to record this process. I suggest that for the next assignment that you look through all your previous work in this way and lay out the key pieces. Look for connections and write them down. This should help you devise a project proposal to suit you. Remember it is all about what you would like to achieve.
(Look for connections)

Tutor name SHARON TING
Date 5 September 2015
Next assignment due 30th October– please confirm if this is realistic for you.

ASSIGNMENT FIVE REFLECTIVE COMMENTARY

My sketchbook has improved from the first naïve project. My tutor indicated her concern of lack of drawings which has been addressed, allowing me to be creative and to produce a good body of work to draw upon. My drawings skills are now at a point where I am happy with the results, but there are still improvements to be made. There is more awareness of composition and why it is important.

Material choice is now easier to do, but can still get it wrong.

Tutor feedback was a useful guide in selecting areas where I could improve my work. It was taken as criticism until I realised it was to help me to progress.

Overall I was pleased with the end product and the finish was of higher quality than items made before. Extra care was given to the ironing process, as wanted it to be as perfect as it could be.

Although the end products filled the criteria there were certain areas that need improving. The inner lining had to be hand sewn, but wasn’t happy with the stitch work. Hand sewing is not my strongest subject and needs further development to master the technique.

This assignment has enabled me to work on my own. The tutor said I was looking for reassurance with my work and to be confident in decisions made good or bad. I now feel able to judge what works and what doesn’t. I am overcritical of my work and tend to overwork an idea and need to know when enough is enough, as can spoil the overall effect.

One regret is choosing a subject with limited source material and repeated this mistake when using the butterfly tongue. However, by using the spiral shape as a basic idea, showed simplicity is better than an overcomplicated design, which can be seen in my doodles. The viewing frame has helped in selecting small areas which were lost as a whole.

Visiting exhibitions is a problematic (as not able to go in to big cities where there are crowds of people). Although textiles can be reviewed online, the intricacy of stitch work cannot be seen and only can be guessed at.

Time management is an issue for me, as I get carried away with designing and have to curb this by concentrating on the task in hand. For example if work was commissioned there would be time constraints.

Critiquing work has been the hardest thing to do, as feel it never fulfils my expectations. However, the results of this assignment have exceeded this. Generally there has been a good reaction to my work and have been asked to design a waistcoat for a friend, which has increased confidence in my abilities.

In future, I would endeavour to master techniques, such as hand or machine embroidery. My personal voice has started to emerge and feel this is the path that I would like to pursue

The course as a whole has enabled me to be more confident and channel my need to be creative.

 

Student name Caroline Herbert-Carter Student number 512924
Course/Module A Creative Approach Assignment number Five

 

Overall Comments

 

Caroline, you have submitted a large body of design work for this final assignment. This collection of sampling shows your skill in machine embroidery and applied techniques. Sketchbook work incorporates some lovely doodling and design motifs. This volume of work shows that you have fully engaged with the process of creating, creative textile pieces. You have followed some lines of research to inform your understanding of contemporary design. I do feel design work has been limited in variation due to a lack of inspirational imagery. This has also had an impact upon selected colour palettes. It is difficult to find imagery and research that has informed the design process. Your theme needed developing more before the design process began. A theme should be something that offers us a wonderful starting point, something that fills us with lots of inspiration. Butterflies are lovely creatures with scope for creating beautiful textiles. There are glimpses of this within this submission however, I feel foundational research lines were missed at the start, which has impacted throughout this body of work.

(Notes for future work don’t rely on just one source, research more)

I understand your aim is to go for the Painting/Textiles/Creative Arts* Degree and that you plan to submit your work for assessment at the end of this course. From the work you have shown in this assignment, providing you commit yourself to the course, I believe you have the potential to succeed at assessment. In order to meet all the assessment criteria, there are certain areas you will need to focus on, which I will outline in my feedback.

Feedback on assignment
Demonstration of technical and Visual Skills, Quality of Outcome, Demonstration of Creativity

Caroline, this body of creative design work focuses upon butterflies. Initially you have looked at the butterfly tongue, this influences the swirls and spiraling forms found within this project. Intriguing enlargement of images, reveal more texture, depth and detail. Photoshop has supported this investigation of zooming into selected areas with differing intensity, forming an almost time-­‐lapse feel and sense of movement. The swirls have been translated well into machine-­‐embroidered samples within this book.

Within these design pages you have looked to represent these images via drawing. Crayon studies did not give a result you were happy with. I would recommend tenacity in translation via drawing through testing of alternative mediums such as swirling paint (for example: acrylic, watercolour or gouache), pastel and oil pastel blending or intricate collage work. There are more studies using crayon and charcoal, however, when you begin to use paint with design ideas, your work becomes more harmonious. These are blended effectively the palette is more sensitive and balanced. More graphic, linear simplistic drawings are employed to depict design ideas such as: bowls, jugs, vases and other unusually shaped vessels. This leads to the formulation of waistcoat designs with detailed panel.
The mono prints were very interesting, lovely in texture and composition, the swirls become hazy, more abstracted. I would have liked to see this extended, developing this line of enquiry. A series of circular samples investigate: braided wool, knitting with wool and wire, voile, cotton, velvet, plus gold fabric. Stitches used include: hand chain, long, blanket, straight, and satin embroidery techniques. Applications such as: beadwork, ribbon, rickrack, spraying bleach, food colouring and acrylic paint are worked over surfaces. This shows a development of visual and technical skills, design and composition.

(extend monoprints)

Gold yarn is then used over a green background using machine stitching. The felting provides an interesting surface worked with scrim. You feel this is not sharp enough so move forward with more defined studies in ribbon, braid and lace, again, using the spiral form. The alien-­‐like pattern inspired by the butterfly tongue is particularly successful. You work very effectively when materials led with machine embroidery. This sample has movement, a fluid abstracted linear quality with the painted background, shapes adding dimension and depth. I would strongly recommend that you extend and develop this more considered approach, perhaps producing a series of designs based upon this sensitive composition.

(Extend my knowledge of dimension and depth)

Larger Sampling:
Caroline, you have produced a volume of interesting textile samples, predominantly using machine embroidery techniques. Having laid all your course samples out, you connected more to machine embroidery, feeling this was your strongest area. Looking at the work of Annemicke Mein inspired you to follow this path. On viewing Annemicke Mein’s website, I can see she has a beautiful palette, in her study of natural elements. There are images of her outside studying the environment with her drawing board.

(develop my feelings within my work)

 Within, your sampling you have evidenced good technical skills, using: cutaway, felting, embroidered net, applique, hand painting, dyeing, layering, hand embroidery techniques, among other applications. These skills build interesting textured layers with a sense of depth and dimension. I would question the basis of your colour palette. The work of Annemicke Mein, is sensitive, having an almost watercolour feel with colours blending in soft harmonious tones. You have submitted a vast range of colours, textures and material bases. I would strongly recommend that in future works you define a colour palette. Do this by using inspirational imagery or taking your own photographs outside in relevant sites. There are many botanical artists to be found in libraries, museums or websites.

(Use more photographs, libraries, museum and websites to make my work stronger)

You could also consider the fragility of butterflies. This could be expressed through materials such as silk, voile, muslin, transparencies, etc. Edges of samples may resemble the soft, undulating nature of wings. This could be tested via burning away, leaving raw, fraying, etc. Many of your samples are quite heavy, with gilded gold thread, although attractive, I think the fragility of butterflies is somewhat, lost.

(consider the subject matter more)

I would also strongly recommend that you revise your presentation of these samples. The black, flimsy files do no justice to all of this intensive work! Consider placing these in a lovely box or file. Elevate these pieces with considered, beautiful, contemporary presentation. Submitted in this format indicates: adequate realisation of ideas and satisfactory/poor presentation of work.

(enhance presentation skills. After this report, I completely dismantled the work and reworked, with pleasing results)

Waistcoat:
Caroline, well done in the construction of this garment, this evidences your technical skills in developing an interesting worn piece of textile art. You mention within your log that you were not happy with some of the hand stitching in finishing. Having studied fashion for many years and working as a designer for over ten years, I can appreciate the work that has gone into making this waistcoat.

The machine embroidery on net, then mounted on velvet evidences your skill in this technique and is effective. I again, question colour, as this piece is composed of quite strong contrasting tones. It is difficult to see your underlying inspiration of butterflies within this design. The spiral tongue design is clearly depicted but the softness of butterflies is lost in the heaviness of construction and colour.

Covered Box:
The textile-­‐covered box inspired by looking at Virginia Koster’s, work is an intriguing piece. You have again, investigated a number of techniques and applications to create a textural, tactile design. The butterfly tongue is evident in the incorporation of spiral machine embroidery. I am wondering where this fits within this body of work, expecting perhaps that you might fill this vessel with sampling or a treasured textural study.

(the box was an experiment, and have addressed by filling it with samples)

Quality of Outcome:
Caroline, it is clear that you have worked very hard to produce such a wide variety of sampling, the box and waistcoat. The volume is remarkable. I do feel that perhaps focusing upon a more limited range of materials, colours and yarns may have proved beneficial. Fashion designers tend to look at trends and predictions to form colour stories and themes. These tend to be very tight, complimentary and harmonious depending upon season and market. In future projects I would highly recommend that you look at building a story. This story would incorporate fixed colours, saturation of these colours, more definition in materials, surface and composition.

(Need to build a story, with colours, design etc) this has been addressed by supplementary work)

Pantone work with colour forecasting: http://www.pantone.com/pages/fcr/?season=spring&year=2016&pid=11

We Connect Fashion: https://www.weconnectfashion.com/articles/top-­‐10-­‐colors-­‐ women-­‐s-­‐market-­‐s-­‐s-­‐2016

Sketchbooks

Demonstration of technical and Visual Skills, Demonstration of Creativity

Within your online learning log you state: “I have found feelings and emotions were part of how we draw”. Finding that when doodling marks were heavier when you were not in a good mood. I think this is an important reflection, which opens up a closer relationship with expressive drawing. I would recommend that you pursue this line of enquiry noting your feelings and emotions beside each study, logging your findings.

(make sure I record as I do an exercise and explain how this feels)

You go on to say: The choice of theme due to lack of source material, did not enable me to examine textural features”. I am very surprised that you have found difficulty in finding relevant artist, designer, illustrator, textile artists to source inspirational imagery from. I will cover this within learning logs/critical essays.

The A5 sketchbook submitted evidences a good use of mixed media, materials, applications, windings, exploration of colour, and technique. I do feel that perhaps you were lacking enough inspirational imagery. You have worked very effectively with Internet sourced images, however, there is a sense of wondering where the doodles, pattern, design ideas came from. There is a clear indication that you are looking to address drawing and mark making more effectively. The doodles and sketches are very interesting and carefully crafted. Your colour palette is sometimes questionable as again there are no natural references such as images of butterflies within this sketchbook. This leads to perhaps unusual choices in fabric swatches being stuck within final pages. In general, I would encourage you to narrow your palette. Look at the organic natural elements of butterflies and their surroundings for reference. Ensure you have many inspirational images to work from when sketching and working with mixed media. Build fabrics around inspirational imagery, matching textures and tones.

(this advice was difficult to take, however I realise that my choice of material was affected by the limited source material that I chose, and did not follow other research ideas)

Learning Logs or Blogs/Critical essays

Context

Caroline, you have researched: Virginia Koster (embroidered boxes), being drawn to the colour, design and composition; Deb Cooper, a textile artists inspired by the natural world; Joe Romussi, embroidering over photographs; Vivienne Westwood, Alexander McQueen, Vera Wang, Gareth Pugh and Jay Briggs. Here, you are making yourself aware of some contemporary artists and designers. There is a limited breadth of contexts and debates. I would strongly recommend that you seek to find a wider range of practitioners especially those that have a connection to butterflies and botanical studies.

My daughter is currently studying A Level Art; she is working with butterflies, cocoons, chrysalis, insects, wings and their metamorphosis. We have been to our local museum to photograph their draws of preserved butterflies and she has worked with a variety of materials both three-­‐dimensional and two-­‐dimensional studying downloaded images form the web. I understand you find visits to galleries and museums difficult because of the crowds however; sometimes you can make

special appointments to view collections. On the whole I feel that you do not have enough inspirational imagery, artists research and relevant designer information.

(Further to this I have added supplementary work)

You mentioned that it was difficult to find relevant information. Unfortunately, it is not enough to just go forward without research and inspirational imagery. As makers we need to study how other artists express their creative works, via making, materials, techniques, applications, etc. Artists often have intriguing methodologies, philosophies and reasoning for working in the ways they do. Part of this course is to understand other practices and be able to develop our own creative works from this knowledge. Selecting a theme, should give us an exciting starting point, from which, we can begin a journey of discovery. The theme could adapt and change as we discover more exciting information. It is a shame that the foundation of this work was not stronger in research terms.

(research was undertaken, and showed how some artists do the work they do and has made me question why I do something)

There are many other avenues you could have investigated to develop your theme further. These are a few I have thought of for you. I am sure there are many more to discover!

Perhaps one of the most famous contemporary artists recently using butterflies to inspire his practice, Damien Hirst: http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2012/apr/18/damien-­‐hirst-­‐butterflies-­‐ weirdly-­‐uplifting

Van Gogh, famous for his study of butterflies: http://www.vangoghmuseum.nl/en/collection/s0188V1962

Yumi Okita: Creates textile sculptures of moths, butterflies and insects: http://www.thisiscolossal.com/2014/07/textile-­‐moth-­‐and-­‐butterfly-­‐sculptures-­‐by-­‐ yumi-­‐okita/

Maria Sibylla Merian: Famous German Botanical Illustrator: Amazing detailed illustrations of insects, plants, butterflies, etc. http://www.getty.edu/art/exhibitions/merian/

Christian Dior: John Galliano: Madame Butterfly inspired collection: http://www.vogue.com/fashion-­‐shows/spring-­‐2007-­‐couture/christian-­‐dior

Suggested reading/viewing

(research was undertaken regarding, some from the suggested and some of my own ideas, which has been added as a supplementary)

Context

I have already given you plenty of links to follow regarding research, colour, forecasting, butterfly investigation, etc. I strongly recommend that you do look to address some of the areas I have flagged up for assessment. I am an assessor with the oca, therefore I am very aware of the criteria to ensure accreditation. Here are some other useful links to contemporary artists, makers, exhibitions and textile artists that you find interesting in their ways of working, methodology and composition:

Cloth and Memory Exhibition (Salt Mill) http://www.clothandmemory.com/

Lost in Lace (Curated by Gail Baxter) At the Gas Hall, Birmingham Museums & Art Gallery

http://lostinlace.org.uk/artists

Artist Anslem Keifer (who has an interest in materials that decay over time

https://www.royalacademy.org.uk/article/anselms-­‐alchemy http://www.saatchigallery.com/aipe/anselm_kiefer.htm

Anne Wilson (her series ‘Toplogies’ – using deconstructed black lace) http://www.annewilsonartist.com/walkthrough.html http://www.annewilsonartist.com/topologies-­‐va-­‐credits.html Transition & Influence (University for the Creative Arts) http://transitionandinfluence.com/gallery/home.html

Fibre Arts: (Great article) http://www.fiberarts.com/article_archive/reviews/group/throughthesurface.asp Louise Bourgeois – The Fabric Works http://www.hauserwirth.com/exhibitions/743/louise-­‐bourgeois-­‐the-­‐fabric-­‐ works/view/

Books:

  • Quinn, Bradley, (2009), Textile Designers The Cutting Edge. London, Laurence King Publishing, Hudson.
  • Celant, Germano, (2010), Louise Bourgeois The Fabric Works. Milan, Italy, Skira Editore S.P.A.

Pointers for Assessment:

  • Present all work beautifully in a clean, contemporary manner with every item labeled clearly. (Done)
  • Build upon research, lines of enquiry, ensure you know artists & designers that have been influenced by butterflies. (Done)
  • Create colour palettes from inspirational sources – these should be evident throughout your portfolio of work. (Done)
  • Sketch from inspirational imagery, still life, sites or places, real life. (Done)
  • Include personal photographs of inspiration (think about the work of Annemicke Mein – how she interacts with the environment). (Done)
  • Be conscious of building a theme or story before embarking upon design work. This should be a large body of work including downloads from the web, museum & gallery commentary (they have great websites to source from); ensure you have enough study material to work from.

(need to work on)

  • Consider being focused upon harmonious colour, materials and yarns. Limit your palette relate colours to research and inspirational imagery. (done)

Caroline, your strengths definitely lie within machine embroidery and working intuitively. This is evident in this submission. I hope you are able to take on board my feedback and look to refine identified areas ready for your assessment.

I always recommend working as follows:
Research -Research informs drawing/sketchbook/theme – keep referring to research- selection of colour palette/fabric/material/technique – testing those via sampling –keep referring to research – design process/prototype/making finished sampling.

 

Tutor name Lizzy levy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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